“A secret locked” is supposed to mean an Indian Muslim woman’s beauty, which she has kept under her physical hijab,

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My Secret Friend
I may never see you,
listen, talk, or love you.
Maybe someday you will look up,
and find the sky like an empty cup*.

“A SECRET LOCKED” IS SUPPOSED TO MEAN, A MUSLIM WOMAN’S BEAUTY, WHICH SHE HAS KEPT UNDER HER PHYSICAL HIJAB,

[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xxAhtkcoEQ]
You and I are nothing more,
than pieces on a chessboard;
Parts of a puzzle design,
made by the same Divine.
Talk, shout, or whisper, let me know,
break the barrier and let it flow.
Ask me your questions, tell me your secrets,
Trust my heart and we will talk until the sun sets.
Hold my hand and let us embrace,
no matter what it is we’ll face,
no one ever said it would be so easy or hard,
Now come with me and let us go back to the start.
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The wedding is not the marriage. The wedding is a gateway to marriage, a formalised written commitment. Contractual agreements in personal relations are underrated these days. You wouldn’t buy a house or start a job without a contract, but we have romantic notions that a verbal declaration of love is sufficient to entrust our life, heart, emotional and spiritual wellbeing in another person.

Formal, written, structured agreements do have an impact on individuals. Harriet Baber says security is the main reason for marriage, but her argument is a negative one, giving security against what she sees as the minus points of singledom. But I’m arguing that commitment and contracts encourage a more positive state for the couple – otherwise why put in the effort? There is clarity of expectation and direction. There is a clear understanding of joining together in union. There’s the positive mental attitude that says you’re in it for the long haul – and positive thinking is mighty powerful. Marriage in this sense is for the private good.
Having structured units with parameters and responsibilities that society recognises is also for the public good – offering stability, respect and boundaries for that relationship. And marriage seems to be a good thing for children, too. Yet we have no training these days in how to initiate and manage relationships (sex yes, relationships no). It’s all Hollywood and Heat magazine.
Arguments about what marriage is for tend to focus on only one of the three components – the couple, society or children, but the fact is that it’s a little bit of all three. Marriage is a formal written commitment between two people, with clearly spelt out rights and responsibilities on both sides. (That’s the problem with the “expression of love” or “knees up” approach to weddings – instead of focusing on the relationship, it’s all about the party.) These rights and responsibilities are recognised by wider society and enforced either legally or socially. In our culture, one example of these things is usually fidelity. This is usually a clear expectation of both spouses, and wider society is expected to support this. Hence we have the greater (but sadly diminishing) social stigma of having a relationship with someone who is married. Happy, well supported and stable couples mean happier and more stable societies. It’s mutually beneficial.
Marriage has a central place in religion, and Islam is no exception. So, to cover off the religious aspect, here is what Islam says: that marriage is a divine sign in order that the spouses may find peace and contentment in each other, and that love and mercy has been placed between them. In its essence, marriage is for the benefit of the two people involved, creating a tranquil and loving union. But it’s more than that too: to get married is to complete “half your faith”, it is part of fulfilling the human mandate and achieving spiritual perfection. And only then do we get to procreation as the reason for marriage. Islam is big on clear, solid family structure, and children knowing and respecting who their parents are. And it’s also very firm on parents taking clear responsibility for the upbringing and long-term care of their children.
A few months ago I was rummaging through the fabulous second-hand bookshop Barter Books in Northumberland, when my eye was caught (as it is want to do, since I am a writer with a fascination for love and marriage) by a dusty tome entitled Wooings and Weddings in Many Climes. Mainly, I love the word “wooing” and wish we would use it more often. I also wish that as a society there was more wooing going on. First published in 1900, the author travelled through various cultures and brings us stories and pictures of how different peoples engage in marriage. (Particularly good is the one on “Wigwamland”.) The one constant she is at pains to point out is that marriage flourishes in all contexts. This abundance of marriage across time and geography is something that should give weight to this question of what marriage is for and its potential benefits.
More than a hundred years ago, she made an observation that would not be out of place today: “I have found the marriage customs of most peoples strangely alike. And I have found the marriage fact, wedlock itself, almost identical everywhere. […] The highest of all arts is the art of living with others – above all the art of living with those nearest and dearest. How many of our children are ever taught its alphabet?”

I
in a hollow hallway, in life’s way
He smiled at her,
And unto this day
She swears by that smile.
It took a few dates, a few words of amour
Till she felt love,
The kind he talked about.
She swears that it pumped her heart wild.
Love into marriage. A few seasons went by,
She had a few babies,
So much love, she could cry.
She swears by motherhood. Milky motherhood.
A few late nights, a few hotel bills
Unaccounted for,
No, not until
She flew into a rage. She broke down.
Many sweet words, promises to keep,
Fatty, thirty-something —
Lying in a heap,
From the pretty wife into being a pawn.

One head-banging fit, not a friend in the world.
She left her haven,
No more the girl.
A fifty-something, someone, insignificant speck.
Submitting herself to the world: her asylum.
Closure
You whisked away a part of me,
Skirting the issue day by day,
The little emo, the little glee
Was lost. I was on my way
To becoming something better,
To becoming something wise,
No longer tied by fetters,
No need to be Miss Nice;
And then in a moment
Of utter clarity
Was this search for a moment
Where total parity
Could be drawn between us —
I needed to talk.
You didn’t need to give me the “US”
We could just walk…
To tell you and I have to —
To bring closure to me
That as friends do
So shall we..

“A SECRET LOCKED” IS SUPPOSED TO MEAN, A MUSLIM WOMAN’S BEAUTY, WHICH SHE HAS KEPT UNDER HER PHYSICAL HIJAB,


Wedding Night of a Muslim Woman




Wedding Night of a Muslim Woman

My secret locked, a tale untold,
The only key, within your hand,
Too sacred for them to behold,

Too pure for them to understand.
Tonight I tell that tale to you,



An open book for you to read,



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Your book, I yearn to read it too,
And share each breath, your every need.
Gone the lonesome years, weeks, days,
For now our hearts have taken flight,
You look at me with longing gaze,
And I, at you with shy delight.
Love me; love all that I am,
Cherish me as precious treasure,
Teach me with gentle guiding hand
Endlessly seeking His pleasure.
Poem By Fatima Barkatulla
This poem is from Sisters Magazine
______________________________________
What did your wedding night mean to you? I wrote this a few days ago and tried to capture the feelings one has after ones wedding: that evening when for the first time I prayed with my husband, and spent my first hours with him. My wedding day and the early days or weeks after marriage were the dearest days of my life to me. Alhamdulillah since then Allah has given us even more depth to our relationship and has given us wonderful days too, but those early weeks, they are unique. And for a girl from a religious family, who had worn her hijab from the age of 9, it was a totally new experience. Alhamdulillah for the blessings of this life which give us a glimpse as to how wonderful the blessings of the next life might be…
Explanation of the poem: (just to prevent any misunderstandings!)
Well, actually it is about the beauty of Muslim Marriage in general, not just my own personal experience. And it is about how the Wedding Night is the first time that a Muslim couple get to really understand each other’s personalities.



“A secret locked” is supposed to mean, a Muslim woman’s beauty, which she has kept under her physical hijab, “A tale untold” is supposed to mean her personality which she has kept reserved with her inner hijab which is her sense of modesty.
“The only key within your hand”: means that the only person who has access to see her and to get to know her is her husband. The next two lines mean that the people around her, men and women who don’t understand hijab, can’t see the purity in it and are not allowed to see the precious nature of the Muslim women beneath.
“Tonight I tell that tale to you” is meant to mean: that tonight the Muslim woman is able to freely express her personality and tell her life-story to someone at last who really is interested and wants to hear.
The “open book” meaning the story of her life, her biography so far. And the next lines: That she too longs to understand her new husband and where he has been, what he has done and what experiences have made him who he is.
“For now our hearts have taken flight” means that it is on the Wedding Night that Allah puts true love between your hearts, as you get to spend more time with each other.
“You look at me with longing gaze, And I at you with shy delight”, well, there I tried to capture the fact that now the couple can freely look at each other.
The last four verses contain the message that a Muslim woman has for her husband about their marriage to come: to love her and all the good in her, to cherish her and value her, to correct her gently if she needs correcting, to teach her with wisdom, bearing in mind that their life is all about seeking Allah’s pleasure.
My intention for writing it was
1. A sheer sense of creativity,
2. To show to those people who think that the way a Muslim woman is outside her home: (reserved and covered), is backward, extreme, oppressive – that actually, because she reserves herself and covers herself, her Wedding Night is that much more beautiful for her.
3.To give people an insight into how beautiful marriage is for those who have kept themselves chaste, as opposed to those who have casual relationships and don’t reserve themselves with the opposite sex and freely mix with them.
Basically good PR for Muslim marriage

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DEEPAK SING ROSMAH

Inviting - exciting - emotion with power I had never known, a world of unchained devotion because you were my very own. I had fallen in love with you.  Together we sailed in springtime to an isle beyond seas of blue, and when we returned, a new life was waiting, in a valley of dreams where I first fell in love with you.
ROSMAH SING TO DEEPAK
A Single rosma of love A Single rosema of devotion A Single wish upon my lips A Single thought of you A Single desire to be granted A Single moment of careless bliss A Single love never to be broken A Single rosma for one last kiss
10 Amazing Facts about Love
Love is a light of your life. Everyone know that love increases our live’s quality. If still there are some people who don’t believe this, we have found some funny scientific love facts to prove this theory:)
1. People are more likely to tilt their heads to the right when kissing instead of the left (65 percent of people go to the right!).
love facts

2. The oldest known love song was written 4,000 years ago and comes from an area between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers.
3. One in five long-term love relationships began with one or both partners being involved with others.
funny love facts
4. Falling in love can induce a calming effect on the body and mind and raises levels of nerve growth factor for about a year, which helps to restore the nervous system and improves the lover’s memory.
5. Love can also exert the same stress on your body as deep fear. You see the same physiological responses—pupil dilation, sweaty palms, and increased heart rate.
funny love facts
photo by Bob.Fornal
6. Philadelphia International Airport finished as the No. 1 best airport for making a love connection, according to a recent survey.
7. Men who kiss their wives in the morning live five years longer than those who don’t.
8. The tradition of the diamond engagement ring comes from Archduke Maximillian of Austria who, in the 15th century, gave a diamond ring to his fiancée, Mary of Burgundy.
funny love facts
photo by Alfon…*
9. People who are newly in love produce decreased levels of the hormone serotonin —as low as levels seen in people with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Perhaps that’s why it’s so easy to feel obsessed when you’re smitten.
10. According to mathematical theory, we should date a dozen people before choosing a long-term partner; that provides the best chance that you’ll make a love match.
P.S.: This one may not surprise you, but we had to share it: Having a romantic relationship makes both genders happier. The stronger the commitment, the greater the happiness!

funny love facts
photo by TIO…

Is not a Kiss the Very Autograph of Love?



I ONLY DO BUSINESS WITH ROSMAH, SAID THE CARPETMAN. MY RELATIONSHIP WITH ROSMAH IS ONLY FOR BUSINESS PURPOSES. I AM NOT SLEEPING WITH ROSMAH, HE PLEADED. SO PLEASE DO NOT TELL THE PUBLIC THAT I AM ROSMAH’S TOYBOY. THE IMPRESSION HE WANTED TO MAKE IS THAT HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH ROSMAH IS CONFINED TO THE BOARDROOM AND DOES NOT EXTEND TO THE BEDROOM.
WELL, THAT IS NOT WHAT MUMTAZ JAAFAR SAYS. AND WHO IS MUMTAZ JAAFAR? HEY, IF I START TALKING ABOUT HER THEN I WOULD ALSO HAVE TO MENTION HER RELATIONSHIP WITH SAIFUL, THE PERSON WHO ALLEGES THAT ANWAR IBRAHIM SODOMISED HIM. AND IF I START TALKING ABOUT THAT THEN WE WILL END UP TALKING ABOUT THE SODOMY 2 CASE AS WELL. SO LET’S GET BACK TO THE SUBJECT OF THE CARPETMAN, ROSMAH’S BAGMAN CUM TOYBOY.
THE WHOLE COUNTRY IS VERY FOCUSED ON NAJIB TUN RAZAK’S EXTRAMARITAL AFFAIRS. SURE, EVERY MALAYSIAN KNOWS ABOUT THIS. AND EVERY MALAYSIAN ALSO KNOWS ABOUT HIM GETTING CAUGHT IN A PORT DICKSON HOTEL ROOM WITH ZIANA ZAIN. IN FACT, ISA SAMAD EVEN HAD PHOTOGRAPHS OF NAJIB CLAD ONLY IN A TOWEL WITH THE DELICIOUS YOUNG THING IN HIS BED. AND ISA HANDED THE PHOTOGRAPH OVER TO THE THEN PRIME MINISTER TUN DR MAHATHIR MOHAMAD. (AND THAT IS WHY MAHATHIR JUST DOES NOT UNDERSTAND WHY NAJIB WOULD CHOOSE ISA TO CONTEST THE BAGAN PINANG BY-ELECTION WHEN IT WAS ISA WHO TRIED TO BRING NAJIB DOWN WITH THE PHOTOGRAPH).
ANYWAY, LET’S NOT DIGRESS TOO FAR. AS I SAID, EVERY MALAYSIAN KNOWS ABOUT NAJIB’S EXTRAMARITAL AFFAIRS. BUT HOW MANY ALSO KNOW THAT ROSMAH HAS A PENCHANT FOR BOLLYWOOD TYPES. HELL, SHE WILL EVEN ARRANGE DATUKSHIPS FOR THEM IF THEY TREAT HER THE WAY SHE LOVES TO BE TREATED, IF YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN. AND THIS PARTICULAR CHAP I AM TALKING ABOUT, THE CARPETMAN CUM BAGMAN CUM TOYBOY, IS FAR BETTER LOOKING THAN SHAHRUKH KHAN (OR IS IT DATUK SHAHRUKH KHAN NOW?) — NOT TO MENTION YOUNGER AS WELL.
YES, I HAVE BEEN KEEPING THIS STORY UNDER WRAPS FOR MORE THAN A YEAR NOW. BUT IT IS NOW TIME THAT THE STORY BE TOLD. THERE IS MORE, THOUGH. DEEPAK THE CARPETMAN CUM BAGMAN CUM TOYBOY HAS BEEN VERY NAUGHTY. AND ALL THESE NAUGHTY DEEDS WERE DONE ON BEHALF OF ROSMAH.

1. Romeo and Juliet
This is probably the most famous lovers ever. This couple has become a synonym for love itself. Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy by William Shakespeare. Their love story is very tragic. The tale of two teenagers from two feuding families who fall in love at first sight and then marry, become true lovers and then risk it all for their love. To take your own life for your husband or wife is definitely a sign of true love. Their “untimely deaths” ultimately unite their feuding households.
2. Cleopatra and Mark Antony
The true love story of Antony and Cleopatra is one of the most memorable, intriguing and movingof all times. The story of these two historical characters had later been dramatized by William Shakespeare and is still staged all over the world. The relationship of Antony and Cleopatra is a true test of love. They fell in love at first sight. The relationship between these two powerful people put the country of Egypt in a powerful position. But their love affair outraged the Romans who were wary of the growing powers of the Egyptians. Despite all the threats, Anthony and Cleopatra got married. It is said that while fighting a battle against Romans, Antony got false news of Cleopatra’s death. Shattered, he fell on his sword. When Cleopatra learned about Antony ‘s death, she was shocked. And she took her own life. Great love demands great sacrifices.
3. Lancelot and Guinevere
The tragic love story of Sir Lancelot and Queen Guinevere is probably one of the best-known stories of Arthurian Legend. Lancelot fall in love with Queen Guinevere, King Arthur’s wife. Their love grew slowly, as Guinevere kept Lancelot away from her. Eventually, however, her love and passion overpowered her and the pair became lovers. One night, Sir Agravain and Sir Modred, King Arthur’s nephew, led a band of 12 knights to Guinevere’s chamber where they burst in upon the lovers. Discovered, Sir Lancelot made a fighting escape, but poor Guinevere was not so lucky. She was seized and condemned to burn to death for her adultery. Fear not. Sir Lancelot returned several days later to rescue his beloved Guinevere from the fire. This whole sad affair divided the Knights of the Round Table and weakened Arthur’s kingdom. Poor Lancelot ended his days as a lowly hermit and Guinevere became a nun at Amesbury where she died.
4. Tristan and Isolde
The tragic love story of Tristan and Isolde has been told and retold through various stories and manuscripts. It takes place during medieval times during the reign of King Arthur. Isolde of Ireland was the daughter of the King of Ireland. She was betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. King Mark sent his nephew, Tristan, to Ireland to escort Isolde back to Cornwall. During the voyage, Isolde and Tristan fell forever in love. Isolde did marry Mark of Cornwall, but could not help but love Tristan. The love affair continued after the marriage. When King Mark finally learned of the affair, he forgave Isolde, but Tristan was banned from Cornwall. Tristan went to Brittany. There he met Iseult of Brittany. He was attracted to her because of the similarity of her name to his true love. He married her, but did not consummate the marriage because of his love for the “true” Isolde. After falling ill, he sent for Isolde in hopes that she would be able to cure him. If she agreed to come, the returning ship’s sails would be white, or the sails would be black if she did not agree. Iseult, seeing the white sails, lied to Tristan and told him that the sails were black. He died of grief before Isolde could reach him. Isolde died soon after of a broken heart.
5. Paris and Helena
Recounted in Homer’s Iliad, the story of Helen of Troy and the Trojan War is a Greek heroic legend, combining fact and fiction. Helen of Troy is considered one the most beautiful women in all literature. She was married to Menelaus, king of Sparta. Paris, son of King Priam of Troy, fell in love with Helen and abducted her, taking her back to Troy. The Greeks assembled a great army, led by Menelaus’s brother, Agamemnon, to retrieve Helen. Troy was destroyed. Helen returned safely to Sparta, where she lived happily with Menelaus for the rest of her life.
6. Orpheus and Eurydice
Orpheus and Eurydice story is an ancient greek tale of desperate love. Orpheus fell deeply in love with and married Eurydice, a beautiful nymph. They were very much in love and very happy together. Aristaeus, a Greek god of the land and agriculture, became quite fond of Eurydice, and actively pursued her. While fleeing from Aristaeus, Eurydice ran into a nest of snakes which bit her fatally on her legs. Distraught, Orpheus played such sad songs and sang so mournfully that all the nymphs and gods wept. On their advice, Orpheus traveled to the underworld and by his music softened the hearts of Hades and Persephone (he was the only person ever to do so), who agreed to allow Eurydice to return with him to earth on one condition: he should walk in front of her and not look back until they both had reached the upper world. In his anxiety he forgot that both needed to be in the upper world, and he turned to look at her, and she vanished for the second time, but now forever.
7. Napoleon and Josephine
A marriage of convenience, at age 26 Napoleon took a fancy to Josephine. An older, prominent, and most importantly wealthy woman. As time drew on,Napoleon fell deeply in love with Josephine, and she with him, but that didn’t deter the adultery on both sides-their mutual respect for one another kept them together, and their burning passion between them didn’t falter, and was genuine. They eventually split, as Napoleon deeply required something Josephine could not give him, an heir. Sadly they parted ways, both bearing the love and passion in their hearts, for all eternity.
8. Odysseus and Penelope
Few couples understand sacrifice quite like this Greek pair. After being torn apart, they wait twenty long years to be reunited. War takes Odysseus away shortly after his marriage to Penelope. Although she has little hope of his return, she resists the 108 suitors who are anxious to replace her husband. Odysseus is equally devoted, refusing a beautiful sorceress’s offer of everlasting love and eternal youth, so that he might return home to his wife and son. This Valentine’s Day, take a cue from Homer, and remember that true love is worth waiting for.
9. Paolo and Francesca
Paolo and Francesca are made famous by the Dante’s masterpiece “Divine Comedy”. It is a true story: Francesca is married with Gianciotto Malatesta an awful person, but she has Gianciotto’s brother, Paolo, as lover. The love between them grows when they read together a book (according to Dante) about Lancelot and Guinevere. When the two lovers are discovered they are killed by Gianciotto.
10. Scarlett O’Hara and Rhett Butler
“Gone with the wind” can be identified as one of the immortal pieces of literary works in this world.Margaret Mitchell’s famous work has chronicled the love and hate relationship between Scarlett O’Hara and Rhett Butler. Proving that timing is everything, Scarlett O’Hara and Rhett Butler never seem to be quite in synch. Throughout the epic story, this tempestuous twosome experience passion but not permanence, and their stormy marriage reflects the surrounding Civil War battles. The flirtatious, promiscuous, and perpetually pursued Scarlett can’t make up her mind between her many suitors. When she finally decides to settle on being happy with Rhett, her fickle nature has already driven him away. Hope springs eternal in our devious heroine, however, and the novel ends with Scarlett proclaiming, “Tomorrow is another day.”
“If women didn’t exist, all the money in the world would have no meaning.”
~ Aristotle Onassis
Ivanka Trump photo

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