Shammiji shares with us one instance which proved Rafi Saab’s ability to mould his voice to any given style.

Shammi Kapoor Unplugged – Episode – 49 – ‘Yahoo’ was not done by Rafi Saab. Welcome to this ‘Mohd. Rafi special’ episode! Shammiji continues to talk about various events and experiences he shared with the noted singer. He says Rafi Saab was one of the most creative singers that he had ever worked with. Today, Shammiji shares with us one instance which proved Rafi Saab’s ability to mould his voice to any given style. In the famous song ‘Chahe Koi Mujhe Junglee Kahe’ from the film Junglee, Shammiji reveals that the ‘Yahooo’ part was not done by Rafi Saab! Then who did it?

VERSATILE INDIAN ACTOR SHAMMI KAPOOR HAS DIED AFTER A LONG CAREER IN BOLLYWOOD

Posted by taxi2driver on August 15, 2011 · Leave a Comment (Edit)

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 Versatile Indian actor Shammi Kapoor has died after a long career in Bollywood. He was 79.
His doctor Bhupendra Gandhi says Kapoor was admitted to Mumbai’s Breach Candy Hospital two days ago in critical condition. He was on dialysis and died Sunday of kidney failure.
Kapoor was hailed for his lighthearted roles in movies. He belonged to Bollywood’s well-known Kapoor family.
His brothers Raj Kapoor and Shashi Kapoor also were successful actors, and his father, Prithviraj Kapoor, was a well-known theater personality of the 1950s.
Shammi Kapoor made his debut in Bollywood in 1953 and acted in successful movies including “Junglee” and “Professor.” He also appeared in “Brahmchari” and “Janwar.”
He is survived by his wife, a son and a daughter.
Watch a clip of Kapoor’s song and dance from “Junglee,” a playful film that was a turning point in his Bollywood career.

Kapoor was hailed for his lighthearted roles in movies. He belonged to Bollywood’s well-known Kapoor family.

His brothers Raj Kapoor and Shashi Kapoor also were successful actors, and his father, Prithviraj Kapoor, was a well-known theater personality of the 1950s.
With moist eyes and prayers, Shammi Kapoor’s family members and friends bid goodbye to the veteran actor at his funeral at the Ban Ganga cremation ground here Monday morning.
The 79-year-old actor, who was admitted to Breach Candy Hospital, Aug 7, breathed his last Sunday morning after suffering kidney failure. Shammi’s body was brought to the cremation ground around 10.30 in the morning and the last rites were performed by his son, Aditya Raj Kapoor, who was wearing his father’s beads around his neck. The late actor’s brother, Shashi Kapoor, who is himself unwell, attended the cremation on a wheelchair. His nephews Randhir and Rishi Kapoor and his grandnephew Ranbir were also present for the last rites.
Apart from the family, many Bollywood celebrities like Amitabh BachchanAamir Khan, Ashutosh Gowarikar, Prakash Jha, Sanjay Leela Bhansali, Ketan Desai, Satish Kaushik, Subhash Ghai, Jug Mundhra, Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra, Yash Chopra, Nikhil Advani and Sudhir Mishra also came to the cremation ground. Danny Denzongpa, Ranjeet, Fardeen KhanVinod Khanna, Anil Kapoor, Sanjay Kapoor, Tom Alter, Shatrughan Sinha, Tinu Anand and Kabir Bedi were also there. Among the actress who came for the funeral were Priyanka Chopra and Madhuri Dixit. Stringent security measures were taken and the entire area was full of police personnel.
Shammi Kapoor made his debut in Bollywood in 1953 and acted in successful movies including “Junglee” and “Professor.” He also appeared in “Brahmchari” and “Janwar.”
He is survived by his wife, a son and a daughter.
Dear Sir,
“Your name is spoken in awed whispers in studio corridors.”
“He only dubs early mornings so he can get more base in that deep baritone… he knows the script by heart, even other actor’s lines. He is never late, not even by a minute.”
From the nutty Natwarlal, to the transparent green-shirted Coolie; the paan-chewing Vijay to the large-headed Auro (in Paa), we have loved you in every avatar. Such is the hold you have on us, that we will buy chocolates, suiting fabrics, chyawanprash and even a certain oil to keep cool-cool in the hope that we, too, would have 40-year long, successful acting careers.
Like our parents did in 1981, we, too, have prayed with single minded focus for your health. We have visualised the room at Lilawati Hospital and send silent energy to the doctors there, so they may do their best.
We did this because film after film, you gave our often-mundane lives inspiration, hope, courage and catharsis. And of course, the highest value: entertainment. That you have burned yourself for every role is obvious, that heat of self actualization comes right through the movie screen and scorches us. It is as if there is something spiritual, some higher power within, that you access.
Only one request… Almost every great man has left behind a manual, a how-to, a pointer to his processes, his journey, his discoveries, a guide for future generations. How do you build a character and its mannerisms? How do you give energy to what was written in ink and make it flesh and blood? The question that many of us have is, how do you do it again and again? How is it that in every single role, in every nanosecond screen appearance you manage to convince us that what you are saying is the absolute truth? Do you rely on hard work or instinct? Or both?
You offer no excuses, because there are none needed. How are you always before time? Do the rains or traffic or a second cup of tea never delay you? How do you manage to make that which is mass into something of class? How do you remain relevant even when directors are just a tad older than your grand kids? How do you keep up with the tweeters and bloggers? What inner propulsion is this? Can it be learnt or is it karmic? Big boss, please help us figure these out. Do give us the sahi jawaab.
And it is not just actors who would benefit from this, there’s so much else to learn. There’s the integrity and the absolute dignity, the walking into functions alone- without stooges, the not succumbing to disease, the rising above controversy and the resurrecting after failure. It’s been a life full of battles well fought. You have lived a life of the phoenix.
Eklavya-like, we have learnt much by watching every film, several times, in slow motion. Now we await our Drona to put down something, tell us something of his method. Please give us book, a workshop, a film, a biography, a lecture series, anything that we can learn from. The guru-shishya parampara is a sacred Indian tradition where the disciples request the guru to teach what he has spent a lifetime perfecting.
We feel it’s alright to ask because, acting ke rishte mein toh aap hamaare baap lagtein hain
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