SOI LEK A SEX ADDICT SAYS HUDUD BAD FOR MY STEAMY SEXUAL INTIMACY

Dr Chua Soi Lek and woman getting ready for annal sex why was he not arrested for anal sex bloody barisan musa hassan

Do you also fall in this category? Read on to find out… 

With so many cases coming in the limelight about sex addicts, one surely needs to know and understand when a person falls into this category. There have been famous cases where homes and families have got destroyed because of the same.

What is Sex Addiction?
It is best described as a progressive intimacy disorder characterized by compulsive sexual thoughts and acts. While some expert say that it is a mental disorder while others say it is a personality disorder which exists, trashing the reports of those sexologists, who say that there is nothing like this.

People who fall under this category engage in distorted thinking and risks by getting into dangerous sexual flings despite knowing the dangerous repercussions.

Here are some signs which tell you where you stand:
1. Double standards: Most of the times without realizing, the person starts living a secret sex life. You become a compulsive cheater, go to strip clubs and watch loads of pornography.

2. Personal relations getting strained: The person just cannot manage his major relationships with ease. There are loads of lies and another side to the person.

3. Risks are fun: Taking risks like trying to be overtly intimate at public places or in fact trying to have sex where you could end up in legal issues. It gives you a high.

4. Feeling guilty: Even though living their double life is fun for them, but when guilt sets in they go in a complete reclusive mode and blame themselves often bordering depression.

5. Constant look-out for sex toys: So kinky is the way they always think like. Something new, something weird gets them going. But hold on, your partner might not approve with a lot of sex toys you want to use during your act. Your mind might always be preoccupied with these thoughts.

6. Keep law at bay: You can get into serious trouble with the law because of your risky behavior. Getting caught in compromising positions at the wrong places is not only embarrassing but will also tarnish your reputation.

7. Intrusive sex: This is one of the most visible signs of a sex addict. Intrusive sex is touching people here and there in a sexual manner where there is no physical intercourse and the other person is completely unwilling or at times not even aware.

8. Fantasizing someone: While fantasizing someone is common, obsessing about someone is not. This will surely affect your daily functioning and other activities putting you in a tight spot.

9. Irresponsible sex: When involved with multiple partners, there should be some responsibility with respect to the protection that is used. With STDs spreading at an alarming rate, the least you can do is be truthful to the person.

Expert talk
Sexologist, Dr Dhananjay Gambhire feels that it is acceptance by the person which is the first step to the get out of this situation, “A person will keep indulging in these pleasurable activities till the time they are caught. They will just not change their behaviour till the time they come under the scanner. His/her partner’s support and motivation are definitely required in such a situation. More than often experts are required in such situations. There are medicines that are given to control your sexual behaviour and they do help a lot.”

related article https://muslimmalaysia786.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/mca-chulia-street-prostitute-aka-penang-wanita-mca-chief-tan-cheng-liang/

WHAT THIS MCA PORK GOT TO DO ON HUDUD LAW JAWI ARREST THIS ANTI ISLAMIST FOR BLASPHEMY

related article read this http://themalay-chronicle.blogspot.com/2011/01/can-mca-leadership-stop-burning-quran.html Those behind the drive say (The Star) – The DAP has been invited to the forum on hudud and its implications on non-Muslims in Malaysia. “The purpose of the forum is not to challenge anybody. Rather, we just want to explore the law and what implementing it would mean to a … Read more

MCA today ramped up its offensive on Pakatan Rakyat over PAS’ intention to implement hudud law with a panel of experts explaining how non-Muslims would be affected by such laws.
 Investors will flee Malaysia if hudud is made federal law, MCA president Datuk Seri Dr Chua Soi Lek said today.
He said this was because hudud was not fair to all, in particular women, and also prescribed cruel punishments for crimes, contrary to international convention.
“When our record on human rights is not good and the punishment is perceived to be cruel, Malaysia’s international standing will drop.
“Then we will have difficulty in attracting investment and even existing investors may pull out,” he told reporters after opening a forum on hudud at Wisma MCA here.
Dr Chua (picture) also said the stock market will likely fall 10 to 20 per cent once the Islamic law was enacted and would hit the pockets of local investors as well.
“When all sectors of the economy are affected, all Malaysians regardless of religion… will be affected,” he pointed out.
Dr Chua added that while the Barisan Nasional (BN) administration was “not perfect”, Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak at least had a clear vision of how to improve the country.
This was in contrast to the opposition’s uncompromising hudud agenda, which would lead Malaysia down the path to “self-destruction”, he said.
Islamist parties captured an overwhelming majority of votes in the first round of Egypt’s parliamentary elections, setting up a power struggle with the much weaker liberals behind the uprising that ousted President Hosni Mubarak 10 months ago.
The Nour Party, a hardline religious group that wants to impose strict Islamic law, made a strong showing with nearly a quarter of the ballots, according to results released on Sunday.
The tallies offer only a partial indication of how the new parliament will look. There are still two more rounds of voting in 18 of the country’s 27 provinces over the coming month and runoff elections on Monday and Tuesday to determine almost all of the seats allocated for individuals in the first round.
The High Election Commission said the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party garnered 36.6 per cent of the 9.7 million valid ballots cast for party lists. The Nour Party captured 24.4 per cent.But the grip of the Islamists over the next parliament appears set, particularly considering their popularity in provinces voting in the next rounds.
On Saturday, the military-appointed prime minister, Kamal al-Ganzouri, announced that he would pick a new cabinet on Wednesday.
Ganzouri was chosen by the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) after the previous military-approved interim government resigned following a bloody crackdown on protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.
Religious agenda
The strong Islamist showing worries liberal parties, and even some religious parties, who fear the two groups will work to push a religious agenda. It has also left many of the youthful activists behind the uprising that ousted Mubarak in February feeling that their revolution has been hijacked.
Since Mubarak’s fall, the groups that led the uprising and Islamists have been locked in a fight over the country’s new constitution.
The new parliament will be tasked, in theory, with selecting a 100-member panel to draft the new constitution. But adding to tensions, the ruling military council that took over from Mubarak has suggested it will choose 80 of those members, and said parliament will have no say in naming a new government.
“The conflict will be over the soul of Egypt,” said Nabil Abdel-Fattah, a senior researcher at the state-sponsored Al-Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies, calling the new parliament “transitional” with a “very conservative Islamic” outlook.
The Brotherhood has emerged as the most organised and cohesive political force in these elections. But with no track record of governing, it is not yet clear how they will behave in power.
The Freedom and Justice Party has positioned itself as a moderate Islamist party that wants to implement Islamic law without sacrificing personal freedoms, and has said it will not seek an alliance with the more radical Nour Party.
The ultraconservative Salafis who dominate the Nour Party are newcomers to the political scene. They had previously frowned upon involvement in politics and shunned elections.
They espouse a strict interpretation of Islam similar to that of Saudi Arabia. Its members say laws contradicting religion cannot be passed.
Power struggle
Egypt already uses Islamic law, or Sharia, as the basis for legislation. However, laws remain largely secular as Sharia does not cover all aspects of modern life.
If the Freedom and Justice Party chooses not to form an alliance with the Salafis, the liberal Egyptian Bloc – which came in third with 13.4 per cent of the votes – could counterbalance hard-line elements.
It is also unclear how much influence the new parliament will have over Egypt’s democratic transition and how long it will even serve.
The power struggle in parliament could shape up as a fight among the different Islamist trends or between the Islamists and the liberal and secular forces.
The elections, which began November 28, were deemed as the freest and fairest in Egypt’s modern history. Turnout of around 60 per cent was the highest in living memory as few participated in the heavily rigged votes under Mubarak.
The ballots are a confusing mix of individual races and party lists, and the Sunday results only reflect the party list performance for less than a third of the 498-seat parliament.
Another liberal list, the Wafd Party, received 7.1 per cent, while the moderate Islamist Wasat or Centrist Party took 4.3 per cent. The final shape of the parliament will not be announced before January.
The next step in the complex process, a round of runoffs between more than 100 individual candidates competing in the first round for around 50 seats, is set for Monday and Tuesday.
Israeli concerns
The Islamists’ rise is also expected to raise fears in Israel, which shares a border with Egypt and a peace agreement signed in 1979. The Brotherhood has said it will maintain the agreement, though perhaps with slight changes, while Salafis have suggested putting it to a national referendum.
Israeli Defence Minister Ehud Barak on Saturday expressed deep concern over the trend from the first round of voting.
“The process of Islamisation in Arab countries is very worrying,” Barak said on Israeli television, adding however that it was “premature to say how these changes will affect the region”.
In contrast, the Palestinian movement Hamas, which enjoyed a landslide win in 2006 parliamentary elections, said the success of Islamist parties in Egypt was a “a very good result”.
“It will mean more and more support for Palestinian issues,” Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhum said.
Najib Tun Razak reminds me of the little boy who wants to be liked and does all he can to please everyone. He is for 1Malaysia.   He is for Ketuanan Melayu. And he insists, without showing how,  that the two are compatible. In the process, he offends and antagonises both the Malays and non-Malays.
He has seen it fit to embark upon a zealous path of transforming and reforming, riding his high horse like a crusading avenger hell bent upon eliminating any restriction on our civil liberties and any barrier that will prevent our people from developing their minds. Or so it seems. He would like us all to believe that he at last has heard what the rakyat wants and now wants to do their bidding.
Suddenly, in 2011, our students have become mature and responsible enough to dabble in politics. Suddenly, the ISA is no longer necessary and the PPPA is an anachronism from a dark age.
He runs full tilt into this reforming zeal without understanding that one’s enemy sometimes gives one enough rope to hang oneself. Amazingly, he apparently cannot tell that he has already taken enough rope.
He speaks of transforming and reforming, but he in fact deforms. The Peaceful Assembly Bill is a case in point. If he had taken the effort to work out what the rakyat really want, then he would have spared himself the insult of being told that his proposal is more draconian than what Myanmar is doing. In fact, Myanmar is serious about its democratic reform.
So what does he do now? He was already basking in the glory of announcing the bill, with grand assurances of grand intentions. Now he realises that it is easy to announce initiatives but hard to make them happen.
So he tweaks them, like one would tweak the carburetor of a car. But the last such car stopped production in the early 1990s. And this is the problem with Najib. He thinks of the 1990s when people are already in the 21st century. The ISA, PPPA and the law that violated our right to assemble should have been jettisoned well before the turn of the century.
So Najib is playing catch up. But will UMNO let him?What I would like to know is who advises Najib? Who looks at the pros and cons of introducing the Peaceful Assembly Bill and all the other initiatives he has announced since taking office in April, 2009?
I do not need Lim Kit Siang or Anwar to tell me that these are not really initiatives, but simply Najib playing to the gallery of voters. There is no need for a court challenge or a walk by a group of lawyers to tell me that the Peaceful Assembly Bill is another one of those poorly configured moves that are heavy on PR and zilch on substance.

Living the moment

Doesn’t anybody tell Najib that he is making of himself look foolish when he replaces a draconian legislation with another draconian one?  I would have thought that at least Idris Jala would have put his hands up and say, “Excuse me Datuk Seri, but I think we need to go through that PA Bill again.” Or is he too busy plugging up leaks?
Najib seems oblivious to what is happening around him because he lives with the moment. He does not understand that he cannot be all things to all people. And you cannot please everybody. A leader does what is right and does it right. He leads with resolve and  never vacillates.
Najib has a blog. I have one too, and I know the amount of work required to make it relevant and interesting to people who you hope will read what you write. How much time does Najib spend on his blog? I think not enough to write even one article a week. And he says he talks to us through his blog. He even sends me emails to inform me about what is happening on his blog.
Should I be grateful for this or should I see it for what it really is: a cheap shot at “connecting” with us bloggers and the rest of the Internet community. It insults my intelligence. It is yet another attempt by the Najib to seen as Mr Cool, and I am sure it costs the rakyat money. No, you are not cool, Mr Prime Minister. You are wasting our time and our money for no gain to you or to us.
Najib is caught up in lies of his own making. He pretends to be a blogger when he obviously is not. He makes himself believe that he is connecting with the young when what he is he truly doing is acting out the instructions of his PR people.
Now this is what really worries me. If what we see are the best of Najib’s efforts –after all, you must put forward your best effort for public consumption—what happens in the Cabinet? Do they take collective responsibility for stupidity?
All this depresses me. A Prime Minister like Najib depresses because it says much for what we have become. Are we in fact a nation prepared to accept a Prime Minister as bland as an unsweetened tofufa?
Like Pak Lah, Najib is no orator, though he tries. Like Pak Lah, Najib allows the interests of family and cronies to override those of the nation he governs. But Pak Lah was never tempted to hold onto to being prime minister any longer then what he perceived was his time to serve. Leaving Putrajaya was easy for Pak Lah. It will not be so for Najib.

The Pak Lah lesson

Putrajaya is a sanctuary for Najib from his past follies. He needs Putrajaya and that is why he does what he does. He must remain in Seri Perdana. If it requires him to skip the light fandango, he will do so.
Meanwhile, he nervously awaits the 13th General Election. He is not nervous not for the fate of UMNO or Barisan Nasional, but for what it will bring him once the lady sings. Can you remember Najib nervously wiping his perspiring face while making his RM$5 million offer to the people of Sibu to vote for BN not too long ago?
Well, he is sweating buckets at the thought of the general election because he knows he goes into battle with Pakatan Rakyat, backed by an UMNO that will only be too pleased to see him fall. UMNO is not forgiving of leaders who cannot deliver what they require to continue having their way with our country. Ask Pak Lah.
UMNO has a winnable President, says Khairy
UMNO Youth Chief Khairy Jamaluddin, a more mature and measured person today than when he rode in on a wave of controversy three years ago, put it well when he said that a winnable candidate is one thing, but he or she can only do well with the backing of the party. But, as he noted, UMNO has a winnable president.
Former Terengganu Mentri Besar Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh and former UMNO secretary-general Datuk Seri Radzi Sheikh Ahmad made it a little easier for the UMNO President when they said on the sidelines of the assembly that they would make way for new faces in the election.
More may follow in the months ahead but as some pointed out, the problem is less about old faces finding it hard to let go than about aspiring candidates sabotaging each other if they are not picked.
New landscape
Najib’s remark about “orang UMNO” or party loyalists or stalwarts reminded them that being an UMNO member is more than just carrying a membership card, it’s about going the extra mile for the party.
UMNO and the Barisan Nasional will have to rely in a big way on the Malay vote to survive the general election. “People will hear what they want to hear from the President’s speech. His message that we have to adapt to the new landscape, lead in the new media, talk the language of the youth – we can relate to what he is saying,” said Zaki.
Moreover, internal UMNO surveys show that more than 60% of young voters are still undecided.“If we want to tackle this group of voters, we cannot behave like we are still living in the 1980s or 1990s,” said Dr Faizal.
Shahrizat and NFC: Time to Go
People are still talking about the way Shahrizat fired up the Wanita UMNO assembly with her fierce opening speech. This was a new side to the usually decorous politician who is fighting off criticism over her family’s RM250mil cattle rearing project. She is furious about the way the Pakatan politicians have gone for her.
She was like a tigress. Her eyes, dramatised by dark eyeliner, blazed as she went for the jugular of her critics in PKR. The ladies loved the way she turned the tables on PKR president Datuk Seri Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail and her husband Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim. She was basically saying: “Don’t mess with me.”
But UMNO’s top lady is not in a good place now even though there is no doubt about her support from the senior ladies. Some in UMNO wondered whether the message was also aimed at those within the party. Was she also telling critics in the party not to push her around, that the 1.3 million Wanita members could shake up the party if the ladies rebelled?
No one could quite read her at this point in time. Neither could anyone tell where she is heading from here. The National Feedlot Corporation (NFC) issue has hurt her and the collateral impact on the party is still reverberating.
Despite their support for her, the Wanita ladies are quite uncomfortable with Shahrizat’s claim that Pakatan politicians were attacking her because she is the Wanita leader. They are concerned about Wanita UMNO being dragged into a controversy that has nothing to do with the wing.
The controversy was evidently off-limits at the general assembly. She would have felt the heat from the men if not for a looming general election.
The weird thing is that while there was hardly a mention of controversy inside the assembly, it was a top topic outside the Dewan Merdeka. Opinion in the party about the issue is quite negative. Privately, many say she should make a decision about the situation rather than leave it to the President.
Shahrizat has reached a critical junction in her career. She will have to think about whether she is still a winnable candidate and she may have to decide very soon before the issue escalates and pulls more people in or, worse, pulls the party down.
UMNO’s last assembly before the polls settled a number of questions surrounding the leadership. It is quite clear by now that Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad is firmly behind Najib and wants Najib to win well and for UMNO to survive. He is true-blue “orang Umno”. And so is Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi. The two Tuns are not on the best of terms but they are on the same page in their support for Najib and UMNO.
Najib also made it crystal clear that he appreciates Muhyiddin whom he described as a loyal Deputy Prime Minister. He is aware of the gossip out there that he and Muhyiddin have different ideas about UMNO’s direction. The No. 1 and No. 2 are two different personalities but they are “orang UMNO”.
When Najib took over UMNO 30 months ago, the party was floundering, battered black and blue. As Najib rallied the troops at the end of the assembly, everyone could see that this man had taken their party back on the track. He has set them in a state of preparedness for the polls. That was the aim of this year’s assembly.
Very few had seen Najib as an orator but every year, his off-the-cuff speeches in UMNO get better. He made a striking figure in his fuschia pink baju Melayu. Confident, earnest and focused, he spoke like a man who knows he has pulled off a job that very few people could and he has done it to the best of his ability.
He is on top of the game and unfazed by the politics of the day. Most importantly, he knows his party is behind him. Despite having somewhat of a poker face, Najib showed a humorous side as he playfully mocked his opponents. The Malays call it “perli” and the audience loved it.
The feedback coming in from the Malay ground has actually been very positive for UMNO but the party leader does not want his members to take it easy, thinking they are going to make it. He wants them to stay alert, hungry for power and work hard to win.
His message at the assembly was not only for those inside PWTC but as UMNO’s best brand name, he is also telling those outside the party to put their trust in him and in UMNO to lead the Barisan Nasional. UMNO, he is saying, is ready for Battlefield Putrajaya.

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