AN ACT OF DURHAKA PRIVATISING THE ROYAL MALAYSIA POLICE TO UMNO HOME MINISTER HISHAMUDDIN MUST BE EXECUTED BY GUILLOTINE.

IGP Ismail Omar,is a real shame to his Alma Mater UIA, Living in the grey areas


Pathetic. Bet they can’t even do joined-up writing, let alone joined-up thinking Actually our IGP knows very little. The puppet masters don’t usually tell the puppet why something is happening. And given Mahathir’s statement that meritocracy is really bad for Malaysia’s health, this chap is in his position for reasons other than merit.People’s defensive knee-jerk reactions to inconvenient questions is one of the biggest hurdles to progress.

Here’s a job advert, posted online in early October.

“Wanted: Major Crime Investigator”

“Major crime units are responsible for dealing with the most serious types of crime, to ensure their investigation receives specialised investigation. This may include crimes such as murder or rape, and so they can often be high profile cases in the local area, or even nationally.”

If you discount the poor grammar, the repetition and the bad wording, then you can still see that this is a pretty significant job. A responsible job that the public should have faith in. A job for a trained police officer.

But no. This advert was posted on the jobs page of the G4S website (they didn’t return our calls, so I can’t tell you much else about it).

G4S, you may recall, made such a shambles of organising security at the Olympics in London that the police and the army had to be called in to sort things out. How the police liked having their summer holidays ruined, how the soldiers rejoiced in having to do this when many of them were about to be made redundant in government cuts.

This is the name of the game Bloody liarIt is possible that our IGP, Ismail Omar, may not be aware of what is going on with the real situation on the ground. In the police section there may be another special ‘task force,’ higher than any regular commissioned police officers including the IGP, ‘reporting directly’ to Umno. It meant getting political instructions directly from the home ministry via the PM department. There were allegations in the past that the Selangor MACC which investigated the Selangor Pakatan lawmakers; the one that led to Teoh Beng Hock’s death, the state MACC head was not kept informed. The committee led by its deputy state Selangor MACC Deputy Director, Hishamuddin Hashim, was reportedly answerable direct to the top in Putrajaya.The more the police and immigration harassed the rakyat, the more people will vote for Pakatan Rakyat, just watch. Typical buck-passing, just like everyone in authority in the brain-dead authorities here in Malaysia. Its not me guv… its his responsibility…. Pathetic. Bet they can’t even do joined-up writing, let alone joined-up thinking Actually our IGP knows very little. The puppet masters don’t usually tell the puppet why something is happening. And given Mahathir’s statement that meritocracy is really bad for Malaysia’s health, this chap is in his position for reasons other than merit.People’s defensive knee-jerk reactions to inconvenient questions is one of the biggest hurdles to progress.`I have nothing against Muslims’. `I have had Dalit class-mates’. `We are extremely sensitive to the needs of the disabled’.

The problem arises when these white lies are given as responses to specific questions raised in an attempt to identify the possible existence of a problem that you wish to solve. They result in pushing the awkward truth deeper into the teetering pile of `to do’ files!

All the frustration/bitterness behind these assertions is a reaction to the responses I have, or have not (as the case may be), received to (a) emails that I have been sending to various academic institutions. Almost a year ago (TOI, Sept. 24, 2011) I had made a specific recommendation to the Vice-Chancellors/Directors of Universities/Research Institutes regarding the need to make their campuses barrier-free and accessible, and even suggested a possible way to do so; acting on the belief that one shouldn’t leave things to chance, I sent emails – at something like 6.30 am on that 24th itself – to the Directors of various `premier’ Institutions, accompanied by an attached copy of the article (just in case), with an entreaty that they have an access audit’ of their campus carried out by experts in the business; and (b) numerous attempts I have made at directly talking to bosses of such institutions.

THEY CAN BEAT US TO SUBMISSION BUT THEY CAN’T TAKE AWAY OUR OBEDIENCE. SO PEOPLE KEEP BUILDING THE PRESSURE AGAINST UMNO the only way to put everything right in this country is to reject BN totally next election.This IGP Ismail Omar,is a real shame to his Alma Mater UIA. please take an immediate early retirement to enable the nation to appoint a person who is concerned and knowledge about the security of the nation.Immigration dont simply stop people from leaving the country unless they received orders from the police or the Govt. We malaysians will make sure that the top cops and top judges & secretary to the govt and all state secretaries are replaced by a new group of more intelligent people after GE13 once Pakatan Rakyat form the new Govt of Malaysia. Immigration Department says they are acting on police instructions. IGP says its Immigration responsibility. What kind of nonsensical government administration do we have here ?It is too late, all the government offices, judges, are sited to this regime. That make us all Sick. Why, because they take things for granted, like you going to vote to them again after more than half of century. Are we dumb and stupdi, The govt agencies must be given a warning here. If they continue to act on the order of political manipulators, they will see their days in hell! They better repent and rule fairly and justly or they will one day find themselves at the other end of the stick, if not here on earth , then in hell!Immigration blames police, police blames immigration, EC blames the dept of national registration, the AG blames the police , the auditor blames the whole government but where does the buck stop ? UMNO !!! and who heads UMNO- Najib !! So what do you want ? If you want more of this nonsense vote BN ,if not vote them out !!! The choice is ours ,.Whether there was any political string exerted in Putrajaya office we can only find out the truth after BN is thrown out of the government. To conclude it is possible, as with the Selangor MACC special task force, we believe the police have one too – the one not to safeguard the internal security of the nation but the protection of the BN government. This is only our conjecture but in Malaysia everything is possible – when the survival of Umno is at stake. so stop whining and don’t blame anybody else if they are still in power after the elections

Undaunted, the same G4S – and other companies like it – advertise for jobs which the police would normally have done. In fact, this same advert goes on to say that it’s the kind of thing “a retired police officer” could do.

But why privatise the police at all? It’s a question which large swathes of the public in this country can’t get their heads around. Britain gave the world the idea of an independent, state run, supposedly neutral police force – paid for by taxes and answerable to the people. The idea of companies such as G4S running the police instead, answerable only to their shareholders, gives lots of people the shivers.

Still, the Conservative-led coalition government here wants to push on with it. A couple of police forces have swallowed privatisation wholesale, while others are wrestling with it. In Birmingham (Britain’s second-largest city) the police have spent the whole year insisting they’re not for sale. They’ve made the best part of a thousand redundancies at the insistence of the government to save money from the budget – and yet they may still go down the privatisation route. It’s assumed they’re being bounced into it by ministers.

The Police Federation, which approximates a union (the police aren’t officially allowed to form a union) have said over and over that frontline policing will be affected by any move in this direction, and that public safety will be jeopardised.

The problem is that nobody knows how far it will go. The initial idea was that it would only be “backroom staff” doing privatised jobs. Clearly, given the sort of advert quoted above, that’s simply not true. And anyway, as the police themselves say, they’ve been working with civilian staff for decades. So why change things so radically now?

For the past week or so, the British public has been absorbed by a tragic story of a five-year-old girl abducted while playing near her home in rural Wales. She’s gone, disappeared without trace, presumed murdered and a man’s been arrested. All the while, the police comb the countryside, rivers and ditches for her body. People expect the police, a trained force with a pronounced sense of public duty, to do this.

In future (the police fear) it could be a privatised, outsourced bunch of people doing this, looking for a little girl who could be alive or could be dead. How long would the shareholders want the search to go on for once the TV cameras have left? Could they save money by shortening the hours of the search? I can absolutely guarantee you that the mood in Britain is not behind that sort of thing, not one bit.

The problem arises when these white lies are given as responses to specific questions raised in an attempt to identify the possible existence of a problem that you wish to solve. They result in pushing the awkward truth deeper into the teetering pile of `to do’ files!

All the frustration/bitterness behind these assertions is a reaction to the responses I have, or have not (as the case may be), received to (a) emails that I have been sending to various academic institutions had made a specific recommendation to the Vice-Chancellors/Directors of Universities/Research Institutes regarding the need to make their campuses barrier-free and accessible, and even suggested a possible way to do so; acting on the belief that one shouldn’t leave things to chance, I sent emails – at something like 6.30 am on that 24th itself – to the Directors of various `premier’ Institutions, accompanied by an attached copy of the article (just in case), with an entreaty that they have an access audit’ of their campus carried out by experts in the business; and (b) numerous attempts I have made at directly talking to bosses of such institutions

What on earth possessed the British government to reach out to Narendra Modi when it has been treating him as an outcaste since the 2002 communal violence? It had justified its policy to ostracize him on the grounds that he had looked the other way when innocents, most of them Muslims, including three British nationals of Indian-Muslim origin, were massacred by the hundreds. A major diplomatic row between the two countries had indeed taken place after the then High Commissioner of the UK in New Delhi issued a statement blaming the BJP-led coalition government for the killings.

That Modi had handsomely won elections in the state twice in succession left the British authorities unimpressed. They continued to harp on the gross violations of human rights under his dispensation and sneered at his admirers, including, especially, in Britain’s small but affluent Gujarati community, who pointed to his skills as an able administrator and a development Tsar beyond compare. Modi’s critics hailed this stand as a vindication of Britain’s abiding commitment to the rule of law.

The latest development has quite naturally nonplussed them. But they should have seen it coming. The statement of the minister in charge of India in the British Foreign Office, Hugo Swire, is significant in this regard. Reaching out to Modi, he said “will allow us to discuss a wide range of issues of mutual interest and to explore opportunities for closer cooperation, in line with the British government’s stated objective of improving bilateral relations with India.” On the 2002 riots, Swire said his government seeks justice for the families of the British nationals who were killed, and is therefore keen both ‘to support human rights and good governance.’

In off-the-record remarks to the media British officials spoke a less uplifting language. Britain, they said, had taken note of the ‘progress’ in the Gujarat riots cases. After this reverential salute to India’s judicial system, they went on to add that what attracted them to Gujarat were the ‘dynamic and thriving’ opportunities the state offered in business, science and education. Apart from Japan, China and South Korea, many western nations – Australia, Denmark, France and Switzerland – had engaged with Modi. Britain couldn’t afford to miss the bus.

These reasons are of course self-serving  though, yet again, they should not surprise anyone familiar with Britain’s record of double-speak. For one thing, while 200 people have been convicted by the lower courts for their criminal conduct during the 2002 riots, many more are yet to be brought to book. They include some individuals who formed part of Modi’s inner coterie. The chief minister himself is not entirely out of the woods. Add to this his persistent refusal to utter a word of remorse for the innocent lives lost both at Godhra station and in the post-Godhra period.

It is true that several western nations made a bee-line for Gujarat to explore business opportunities in the state. But here is the rub. More than any of them, it was Britain that claimed to be in the vanguard of the protests against the violation of human rights in 2002 and in the efforts to isolate the chief minister in the international community. It applauded the United States for black-listing Modi and for denying him a visa to visit that country. Now British officials are dropping stark hints that the US will follow in Britain’s footsteps and make their peace with Gujarat’s strong-man.

The question remains: why did Britain take so long to realise that it will have to do business with Modi? Why has it discarded the fig-leaf of its concern for human rights? Perhaps it has concluded that Modi is all set to win a third term in office. Perhaps it reckons that once he emerges triumphant again, he will be catapulted to the position of the BJP’s prime ministerial candidate in the next general elections. Perhaps, too, its decision to reach out to him is a signal that the Congress, in its reckoning, is fated to lose in these elections. You never can tell.

Some might be tempted to compare the British government’s decision to reach out to Modi to prime minister Neville Chamberlain’s infamous Munich Pact in 1938. The appeasement of Hitler, ostensibly to ensure that he would be content to subdue the Czechs and spare Europe a devastating war, came a cropper. But to describe Narendra Modi as a Hitler, or to argue that David Cameron has acted like Chamberlain, or to suggest that today’s Gujarat can even remotely be compared to Nazi Germany is not very enlightening. Such comparisons are worse than odious: they are misleading.

What however the changed stance of the British government does suggest is a certain continuity in its foreign policy approach. It is Adam Smith who summed it up in ‘The Wealth of Nations’: ‘To found a great empire for the sole purpose of raising up a people of customers may at first sight appear as a project fit only for a nation of shop-keepers. It is, however, a project altogether unfit for a nation of shop-keepers; but extremely fit for a nation whose government is influenced by shop-keepers.”

In Narendra Modi Britain has finally acknowledged a soul-mate for, the people of Gujarat, too, are noted for their business flair. That the chief minister railed against ‘goras’ (whites) for wanting FDI in multi-brand detail only the other day is doubtless a trivial distraction in British eyes. Modi can afford to wear a condescending grin.

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