Mohd Puad Zarkashi said PAS Islamic State dream only a dream

Umno-owned Utusan Malaysia has listed five possible outcomes from the PAS central committee meeting tomorrow to decide the party’s stand on the Selangor menteri besar issue, but it has cautioned the Islamist party not to be a “yes man” to its allies, DAP”Whatever the decision, PAS should ensure it does not open more paths for groups which do not respect the ethics of alliance, and bows even after being bashed by PKR and DAP, to confirm that PAS is indeed the ‘yes man’ in the opposition coalition which allows its dignity as an Islamic party to be trampled upon just to be able to gain power,” said its editor, Zulkiflee Bakar, today.

PAS’s Shura Council and other senior leaders have made known their views, saying they were standing by Tan Sri Abdul Khalid Ibrahim, pending a final decision.
as the crisis threatened to end the Pakatan Rakyat coalition, PAS vice-president Datuk Husam Musa wrote a stinging open letter accusing Khalid of making the party a pawn in the latter’s bid to remain as MB.
Observers say PAS’s decision tomorrow will be a make or break the coalition as it goes through its most serious crisis of unity, sparked by PKR’s decision to terminate Khalid as the MB, as well as top PAS leaders’ opposition to replace him.
Utusan, which has always insinuated that PAS has been forced to kow-tow to DAP and PKR in the PR coalition, said the Islamist party was now staring at five options.
These include going with the PAS Shura Council’s decision to support Khalid, proposing another candidate to replace Khalid while rejecting the choice of PKR president Datuk Seri Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail, backing the dissolution of the state assembly, or supporting Dr Wan Azizah as the new MB.
Yet a fifth outcome of tomorrow’s meeting, according to Utusan, was for the party to keep mum.
The paper repeated its charge that PAS had been ignored by its allies.
“PAS’s stand in defending Khalid despite his sacking by PKR, since he has got the consent of the Selangor Sultan, Sultan Sharafuddin Idris Shah, has revealed the true faces of its allies,” the paper said, adding that PAS had been given the ultimatum to follow DAP and PKR even before its leaders meet tomorrow.
Utusan added that DAP and PKR “didn’t say anything when two PAS state assemblymen ‘betrayed’ (PAS) by supporting Dr Wan Azizah”.
The paper was referring to Hulu Kelang and Morib assemblymen, Saari Sungib and Hasnul Baharuddin, who are among the 30 Selangor elected representatives who have pledged support for Dr Wan Azizah.

It said in the event PAS agreed to state elections, the party would not be part of the PR coalition owing to its stand in the current crisis.

Party-less Khalid has so far remained adamant by staying in power, saying the sultan has requested that he remain the MB until August 27, when the ruler returns from abroad.
Umno supreme council member and Titiwangsa UMNO chief
 Ask not what your Islam can do for you, ask what you can do for Islam
The intricacies of the cases continue to be subjected to close and critical scrutiny in thenew media. But the larger picture they reveal hasn’t attracted the requisite attention: the growing disconnect between the “hardware” and the “software” of Malaysia democracy. The “hardware” of democracy include legislative and executive institutions Parliament, state assemblies, etc, the judiciary, official statutory and non-statutory bodies, political parties and the media. And the “software” relates to the observance of rules and regulations, conventions and precedents to enable the institutions to function in a transparent, accountable and effective manner. What is the record? Judged according to these standards, our Parliament and state assemblies are little more than a hotbed of interminable intrigue, confrontation, mud-slinging, filibustering and sometimes also outbursts of violence. This numbs the nerves of the executive and paralyses the legislature. The one cannot govern while the other cannot enact laws, adopt policies or, so far as the opposition is concerned, even act as a watch-dog of the government of the day. What stands out, therefore, is a mockery of their constitutional responsibilities.
Economic crises coupled with the rise of a new aspirational class that is urban, mobile, well informed and often young have brought Malaysia to a political inflection point.
‘White lies’by PAS are a necessary lubricant to keep the wheels of democracy turning You know only too well Democracy is totally dependent on white lies called ‘election manifestos’, in which political candidates promise you the sun, moon and all the stars of zodiac, in return for your vote. You know, and they know, that after you vote for them, you’re not going to see them, till the next election, and that you’re never going to see all those goodies they promised you. But what the heck. You vote for them anyway. All for the sake of a white lie – a truth untold – called democracy. Which is not only our manifest, but our manifesto destiny.The political parties are no better. Their public spats are less about policies and programmes and more about the acquisition of power and pelf. Many of them are akin to privately-controlled family businesses like DAP. Inner-party democracy is a rumour to them. readmore Datuk Johari Abdul Ghani said if Malas

PAS now consists of 2 groups, i.e: the Orthodox & the Heterodox. The 1st is for UMNO & the latter is against UMNO. New Malaysians as a whole are for the latter. The break-up will be seen soon anyPartyto undertake. Not least because, in seeking to make our democracy more truly voter-friendly, it would enhance its own appeal for the electorate. With its eye on the long-term target of Ballot 2018, Numbers game – Time to make the electoral process truly democraticThis is one of the paradoxes of the numbers game which is democracy: in the uncertain arithmetic of elections, even when the numbers add up they don’t add up, and minuses can become pluses. A number of ways have been suggested which might help to resolve partially at least some of these anomalies.
another Umno supreme council member Mohd Puad Zarkashi said if PAS decides to make a U-turn in supporting PKR president Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail as Selangor menteri besar, it is a clear sign that the Islamic party does not respect the views of its religious scholars.
PAS leaders are meeting tomorrow to decide if it will still back embattled Selangor Menteri Besar Tan Sri Abdul Khalid Ibrahim after two of its assemblymen declared support for PKR president Datuk Seri Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail as the new MB. – The Malaysian Insider pic, August 16, 2014.

“Whatever the decision, PAS should ensure it does not open more paths for groups which do not respect the ethics of alliance, and bows even after being bashed by PKR and DAP, to confirm that PAS is indeed the ‘yes man’ in the opposition coalition which allows its dignity as an Islamic party to be trampled upon just to be able to gain power,” said  Umno-owned Utusan Malaysia editor,as the crisis threatened to end the Pakatan Rakyat coalition, PAS vice-president Datuk Husam Musa wrote a stinging open letter accusing Khalid of making the party a pawn in the latter’s bid to remain as MB.

Observers say PAS’s decision tomorrow will be a make or break the coalition as it goes through its most serious crisis of unity, sparked by PKR’s decision to terminate Khalid as the MB, as well as top PAS leaders’ opposition to replace him.
Utusan, which has always insinuated that PAS has been forced to kow-tow to DAP and PKR in the PR coalition, said the Islamist party was now staring at five options.
These include going with the PAS Shura Council’s decision to support Khalid, proposing another candidate to replace Khalid while rejecting the choice of PKR president Datuk Seri Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail, backing the dissolution of the state assembly, or supporting Dr Wan Azizah as the new MB.
Yet a fifth outcome of tomorrow’s meeting, according to Utusan, was for the party to keep mum.
The paper repeated its charge that PAS had been ignored by its allies.
“PAS’s stand in defending Khalid despite his sacking by PKR, since he has got the consent of the Selangor Sultan, Sultan Sharafuddin Idris Shah, has revealed the true faces of its allies,” the paper said, adding that PAS had been given the ultimatum to follow DAP and PKR even before its leaders meet tomorrow.
Utusan added that DAP and PKR “didn’t say anything when two PAS state assemblymen ‘betrayed’ (PAS) by supporting Dr Wan Azizah”.
The paper was referring to Hulu Kelang and Morib assemblymen, Saari Sungib and Hasnul Baharuddin, who are among the 30 Selangor elected representatives who have pledged support for Dr Wan Azizah.

It said in the event PAS agreed to state elections, the party would not be part of the PR coalition owing to its stand in the current crisis.

Party-less Khalid has so far remained adamant by staying in power, saying the sultan has requested that he remain the MB until August 27, when the ruler returns from abroad.
The political saga of Parti Keadilan Rakyat (PKR) has been dragging on for far too long. Granted, it was triggered by power struggle within the party, but what started as an internal affair has now snowballed into a constitutional crisis involving the  Sultan of Selangor.
Malaysia practices a parliamentary system both at the state and the federal levels. It means that the Prime Minister, Chief Ministers and Menteri Besars must command the support and confidence of the Dewan Rakyat or the state assembly in order to remain in the job, and the role of the rulers is largely ceremonial as is the case with other constitutional monarchies such as the United Kingdom, Japan, New Zealand and Australia.
Count not Thailand, where parliamentary democracy with a figurehead has again slipped into a coma. This is not to say the Sultan or the Yang di-Pertuan Agong has no power whatsoever in terms of forming a government. Far from it. The Ruler is duty-bound to ensure a government can function effectively and efficiently, with the head of government being supported by the Dewan Rakyat or the state assembly. When this is not the case, the ruler ought to instruct the speaker to convene a special sitting on a vote of confidence, or the lack thereof.
As in other constitutional monarchies, the ruler in exercising his powers ought to be sensitive to the feelings of the members of the legislative assembly. Hence, when 30 of the legislators came out in support of Wan Azizah Wan Ismail, it became clear that Khalid Ibrahim had lost the confidence of the Selangor assembly.
While it was Khalid’s prerogative to sack the six state executive councilors as rightly pointed out by Professor Abdul Aziz Bari, at issue is whether Khalid was still a legitimate Menteri Besar at the time when the dismissals were announced.
I do not dismiss there may have been certain grievances on the part of Khalid in how the PKR leadership has treated him. However, what is now at stake is our constitutional monarchy that has been severely tested since 2008. Had Khalid chosen to step down in dignity and to prepare for a political comeback at the grassroots level, he could have safeguarded the royalty as well as the spirit of democracy.
Dragging the monarch into the showMonarchy is clearly part of Malaysia’s state institutions but it is also one that must take into consideration common sense and public opinion. We don’t just exhaust all our resources for an election and, after casting their vote, people are made to realise painfully that the man who has lost support remains in power by dragging the monarch into the show.
It is utterly ludicrous for some to liken Khalid’s situation now to that of Anwar Ibrahim back in 1998. In fact, the contrary is true. Khalid is behaving exactly like Mahathir Mohamad by abusing his executive powers just to stay afloat. Worse, he has defied the tradition by refusing to bow out gracefully despite losing more than half of the state assembly’s support, counting on time and the sultan to extend his shelf life.
Thatcher and BlairWhen Margaret Thatcher (left with Tony Blair) came to terms with the agony of her no longer enjoying the confidence of her own party in November 1990, she went to see the Queen not to seek support, but to resign her post as Britain’s Prime Minister. In Australia, both Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard did the same in a most honourable fashion so that the sanctity of constitutional monarchy as well as parliamentary democracy could be preserved.
Then again, Malaysia is so different that, in the name of religion, race and royalty, a power-crazy politician can disregard the well-established institutions and principles in pursuit of personal gains.
Khalid has never impressed me, but I used to prefer him to the corrupt-to-the-core UMNO warlords like Khir Toyo. If anything, I had become more and more sceptical of his democratic credentials after his failure to rein in the Selangor Islamic Affairs Department over the seizure of the Bibles and his extraordinarily pro-UMNO stance on the Kidex project.
With the benefit of hindsight, one can safely say Khalid had acted in cahoots with UMNO over these two controversies.Whatever ‘achievements’ Khalid may have made over the past six years, he has destroyed them all with his intransigence and recalcitrance (a word made famous by, alas, Mahathir!). from now on, he will be best remembered as yet another infamous Menteri Besar who has contributed substantively to the demise of constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy in Selangor, a legacy that is far more damaging than those by any of his predecessors.readmorePKR makes a clean break Abdul Hadi Awang damage irrevocable Hard for PAS to regain trust of Selangor Chinese and Indian voters

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